SC Mag

SC Mag

By Jeanne Huybrechts, Chief Academic Officer, Stratford School

Ways you can help support your child’s learning

Hard work and involvement can ensure a student’s progress

Currently parents of young children are facing two scenarios that may extend throughout the school year. In some parts of the country and in some circumstances, schools are reopening, and children are returning to campus and the classrooms they abruptly left more than six months ago. In much of the country, “return to school” means returning to some form of distance learning – either full time or embedded in a hybrid model of recurring cycles of traditional school and online instruction. That said, school will look different for a while, and there are many things that parents can do to help their children navigate the differences.

Minimize morning drama. Build a lifelong habit!

Most “return to campus” models include modifications to classroom seating, fewer opportunities for children to move around during the day and interact in “centers” and small groups, and new health and safety practices that take some getting used to. Preparing for school in the morning will likely take more time and this is something that parents can help manage.

  • Getting ready for school will take more time this year yet it doesn’t have to be more stressful. Manage the added workload by getting as much done the night before. Begin asking your child to make/assemble his/her own lunch or clean his backpack, returning to it only what he/she needs for the next day.
  • Create a staging area in the house where everything that needs to go to school the next morning – backpack, art project, umbrella, filled water bottle, permission slips, two clean face masks – is ready to grab on the way out the door.

Music, Art, Team Sports, Competition

Even schools that can open this fall will not be able to accommodate programs and practices that were always good for children – including performing arts and organized sports. Both are ensemble/team endeavors, and each builds skills and habits of mind not emphasized in other areas of school.

  • Encourage your child to learn or continue practicing a musical instrument, working with an instructor who can teach online. (I have known kids who have learned to play an instrument just by watching how-to YouTube videos!)
  • In the absence of organized sports, youngsters can fulfill the “activity” piece with daily exercise, inside or outside. Biking, hiking, roller skating, and running are all great and flexible choices. 

“Maslow before Bloom”

One hears this expression a lot in education circles, as most teachers are quite familiar with the work of Benjamin Bloom and Abraham Maslow. Psychologist contemporaries, Bloom and Maslow developed frameworks to describe human understanding, but from different angles. Bloom’s taxonomy describes learning goals, including knowledge, comprehension, and understanding. Maslow describes a hierarchy of needs – physical and psychological – including safety, belonging, love, and esteem. “Maslow before Bloom” implies that basic human essentials need to be addressed before learning can occur.

IMG 1341

As we embark upon this school year, “Maslow before Bloom” should be every teacher’s and parent’s mantra. Whether children are returning to school buildings and friends they haven’t seen for six months or embarking on a year of distance learning with a teacher they haven’t yet met in person, the first order of business should be building comfort and trust. Trust-building should be a priority and developed throughout the year.

  • Early in the school year, reach out to your child’s teacher and introduce yourself and your family. Share family stories, values, your family’s living situation this fall, your child’s feelings about the return to school.
  • In the best schools, teachers and parents partner and support each other, and that has never been more important than now. Even if your child is able to return to campus during the day, organized after-school programs will probably be eliminated or very limited, meaning, once again, you will be spending more time filling in the gaps. You and your child’s teacher can learn from each other and that amplification of learning benefits your child.

Working together, parents and educators can prepare each child for a path to success. After all, as we have heard, many times it does take a village to make it happen.

Santa Barbara has been dubbed “the American Riviera,” and it certainly lives up to the moniker. A stunning, laid-back Golden State community replete with every activity you could dream of between the mountains and the sea, the city boasts sandy beaches, world-class wine, and thrilling nature just outside its proverbial front door. Founded in the late 1700’s, the Spanish influence can still be felt today - from the Old Mission Santa Barbara, and among the charming architecture of the the city’s historic structures. Less than 100 miles from Los Angeles, it’s the ideal destination for filling those dog days of summer or resetting the clock in the fall, especially amid all the uncertainty of recent times.

Santa Barbara Adventure Co.Santa Barbara Adventure Co.

Our family planned a recent weekend staycation with the goal of getting outside, exploring the environs and experiencing a screen-free few days away. “Santa Barbara’s favorite beachside hotel” located in the city’s popular West Beach neighborhood, The Eagle Inn (www.theeagleinn.com) proved to be the perfect “home base.” The charming bed-and-breakfast style boutique property - characterized by its historic Santa Barbara Spanish-Colonial architecture - is literally steps away from the marina and beach and all its attraction and recreation and easy walking distance to the iconic Stearns Wharf, The Funk Zone and State Street, the area’s main shopping/dining destination (more on that in a minute).

StearnsWharf DolphinFountain PhotobyMarkWeber

All of the inn’s guest rooms are luxuriously appointed with modern amenities and some of its accommodations feature oversized whirlpool tubs, fireplaces and verandas or patios. Our family stayed in one of the freestanding casitas (little houses) - the Santa Cruz which showcases an en-suite kitchenette and sun-drenched sitting room (with queen-sized sofa bed) afforded our family of four plenty of space to stretch out. Perks of staying here include the complimentary use of bicycles, daily hot breakfast delivered to your room and freshly baked cookies each afternoon.But perhaps the biggest benefit is its ideal location central to absolutely everything our family wanted to do for the weekend.

227 3 PAN 1

A three-minute walk to the Santa Barbara Harbor and we were ready to embark on a sunset kayak tour with our guide at the Santa Barbara Adventure Company (sbadventureco.com). We spent 2+ hours on the water, coasting by a myriad of watercraft from luxury yachts to fishing boats and kelp harvester and paddling past a dredge populated with an array of waterfowl- blue herons, California brown pelicans and gulls. Two particular highlights - the repeated appearance of a curious sea lion pup popping up between our kayaks and the visual spectacle of hundreds of terns diving from the sky to skim the surface of the water in front of us. Our super knowledgable, animated and entertaining guide Mark made our tour memorable - and it’s obvious he loves his job. Seriously, what’s not to love - we all had so much fun, we could get used to spending every afternoon on the water.

Santa Barbara X

Or at the ocean’s edge. The next day we borrowed bikes to pedal the Cabrillo Bike Path which connects Shoreline Park to Butterfly Beach - about a four mile, mostly flat trek that takes cyclists past the Santa Barbara Harbor and the iconic landmark Stearns Wharf (the oldest working wharf in the state, built in 1872 - with spectacular views of the Santa Barbara coastline and the Santa Ynez Mountains), along a palm tree-lined path from East and West Beach and the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge before arriving at a scenic overlook surrounded by floral blossoms with the sparkling seas of Butterfly Beach below.


Self-guided walking (shopping and dining) tour

Santa Barbara’s hard-hit hospitality industry has been incredibly inventive and resourceful in adapting to COVID-19. One of its major developments is a temporary 9-block State Street Pedestrian Promenade, which opened in late May and will remain open at least until Dec. 8th. Restaurants have outdoor seating along the sidewalks and streets, and its a joy to stroll leisurely down the corridor.

The Eagle InnThe Eagle Inn

We strolled to to breakfast at D’Angelo Bakery (dangelobakery.com) on Guiterrez Street. Offering freshly baked European style bread and pastries and delicious, made-to-order meals, D’Angelo has been a fixture in the community since 1991 - popular with both locals and tourists lucky enough to stumble upon this culinary gem.

As expected, my kids went right for the sweetest options on the menu - our son selected the “uniquely ours” Banana Foster French toast which arrived with an abundance of sliced banana and brown sugar, flambeed with rum, while our daughter opted for a traditional French toast made from fresh baguette slices. For my part, I went straight for the Salmon Breakfast Croissant and discovered my new favorite morning meal - a supremely flavorful fresh baked croissant piled high with smoked salmon, arugula, tomato, red onion and capers. In the mood for more of a mid-day meal, my husband tried a decidedly untraditional, tasty tuna salad sandwich with fresh tomatoes and olive tapenade on toasted country wheat levain bread.

In addition to its flavorful food, it’s worth mentioning the stellar service here. We were warmly greeted by restaurant manager Alex and his staff - all extremely gracious and attentive. It’s no wonder that every table in the outdoor courtyard was occupied for sit-down dining while guests queued up to order takeaway.

The Funk Zone

Once a manufacturing hub in the 19th century, a 13-block mixed-use area near the waterfront, east of State Street, has been affectionately dubbed the “Funk Zone.” Old warehouses and manufacturing plants have given way to a flourishing subculture of artists’ studios and galleries, mural and street art, eclectic wine-tasting rooms, craft breweries/tap rooms, artisanal shops and eateries. Which leads us to Lucky Penny (luckypennysb.com). Located in the heart of the Funk Zone, this small, stand-alone eatery’s exterior is tiled with 164,456 real copper pennies and is home to innovative artisanal pizzas from a wood-burning oven, locally sourced garden fresh salads, griddled paninis, house-made lemonade and handmade sweet treats, including made-from-scratch popsicles. On a warm day, try the signature house-made Frosé, a delicious slushie for adults.

LuckyPenny theLPclassicpizza PhotobyRobStark

Lucky Penny’s wood-fired pizzas were a huge hit - for the kids - the East Coast Pepperoni topped with san Marzano marinara, fresh mozzarella and parmesan and for their mom - the San Daniele Prosciutto and Summer Melon with burrata, pickled fennel and toasted ciabatta. Other inventive options include the Roasted Maitake Mushroom pizza made with garlic cream, grilled sweet corn, mission figs, parmesan and arugula.

Lucky PennyLucky Penny

Take the scenic drive or hike to one of Santa Barbara’s four stunning waterfalls, tucked into the city’s front country. Ranging from easy to intermediate, each hike makes an easy round trip adventure for the whole family. Prefer the beach? Throw a blanket down at one of many sandy ocean stretches along the coast. From dog-friendly Arroyo Burro to world-famous East Beach, there’s something to keep everyone occupied.

DAngelo Bakery 3205

Fine dining, boutique shopping, beachside biking, coastal kayaking or nature hiking in one of the Central Coast’s most sought after retreats. What better time to escape? What better place?

DAngelo Bakery 3063


Visit Santa Barbara
SantaBarbaraCA.com

By Ryan Burris, Chief Communications Officer, Capistrano Unified School District

In past years, the Capistrano Unified School District’s (CUSD) annual college fair has featured representatives from more than 200 universities and colleges, giving thousands of district students and families the opportunity to meet one-on-one with reps and collect information in one place.

That will still be the case for the district’s 2020 college fair, but with a couple of big changes.

This year, CUSD’s college fair has gone virtual and will take place over a four-day period instead of one day.

CUSD is hosting the fair from Oct. 12 to 15. Families can get all the information and register by going to the district’s college and career planning website, cusd-futureology.org, and then clicking on the CUSD Virtual College Fair link.

“We collaborated with our college rep partners from all over the county and all over the world and they have registered and provided their own personal university Zoom links, “ said Beatrice Nguyen, a CUSD College and Career Counselor, who helped plan the event. “We want the families to have that (same) sense of autonomy of walking from table to table and choosing who they want to speak to.”

The Zoom links will be posted live on the college fair website on the first day of the fair, and parents and students and can jump from rep to rep and learn about each school, Nguyen said.

More than 200 colleges and universities are expected to be represented during the fair program, Nguyen said.

“We are going to have a whole spectrum of representation from the Ivy League to the tiniest liberal arts schools and private schools out there,” Nguyen said. “There will be Cal States there. There will be UCs there. The purpose of this is to widen a student’s scope and just let them see how many options they have out there and how many schools might fit their personal needs because it really is an individual choice.”

Also on the first day, which runs from 3 to 8 p.m., two college showcases will take place that run concurrently with the virtual college table displays.

The college showcases include 80 back-to-back, three-minute live highlights from schools, with presenters talking about what makes their programs unique.

“These quick highlight presentations are really great and the reps are really good at highlighting some of the most interesting or important things we need to know about that college,” Nguyen said. “Our hope for this is for families, in the course of two hours, to get the same amount of exposure to a lot of schools without having to do anything but sit down and watch. That was the point behind the showcases.”

The next three days of the fair run from 4 to 7:45 p.m. and will feature a series of 45-minute breakout sessions on a variety of topics.

Those topics include “College Options for Students with Learning Differences,” “Exploring Engineering Programs,” “How to Research Careers and Majors in Your College Search,” and “Pulling Back the Curtain: Applying to Visual & Performing Arts Schools.”

Students and parents will also have access to a “webinar locker” throughout the fair. The webinar locker contains recorded presentations and sessions that the CUSD has hosted in the past. Session recordings will be available the week of Oct. 26. Registration is required for the college showcases and breakout sessions.

“Our district really is offering one of the more comprehensive virtual college fairs,” Nguyen said. “At least in the county. So we’re really proud of that.”


social media block CUSD blueTo register and for more information, visit www.cusd-futureology.org/college-fair

We Are Hiring! 
Para-Educators needed for all CUSD elementary schools. Please see page 59 for more information.

Your Local Resource from Concept to Completion

Pssst. Hey, you, yes you – it is me the Cat. I knew being on the cover in my Sunday best would get your attention - and now that I have it - I’d like to tell you a little about my good friend John Schrab and his tile store - Morena Tile & Stone. John’s family has been setting tile for four generations. His Great Grandpa Tat, – installed the Mosaic State Seal in the Arizona State Capitol building in 1921. His Grandpa – Earnest, was a tile and stone Craftsmen with over a hundred men working for him. His Dad John was a rodeo cowboy, tile and stone contractor and setter who passed his knowledge down to him. As one can imagine, setting tile takes its toll on the body and after 35 years on his paws and knees, John decided it was time to pursue his dream of owning a tile store.

MTS 200229 34

John took over the Morena Tile San Juan Capistrano in 2014 and over the last six years he has put together a real sweetheart of a showroom … 5000 square feet of fun, imaginative and up-to-date tile and stone including porcelain, granite, marble, travertine, limestone and quartz from over seventy – five vendors. Add a few fun-loving customer service-oriented teammates, and a cat as a mascot, and poof you have got yourself one hell a dream come true.

MTS 200229 58

Homeowners, designers, and contractors alike love the selection and the convenience of shopping locally in a store where everybody knows your name. Stop in and have a bite of lunch, a cup of coffee (or have a nip of something a little stronger if you get my drift…) while you look around and talk to one of the designers who are at the ready to give you ideas to get your project started, help with design and tile selection in order to bring your project to life. They know the importance of treating customers like family and handling your dream project as if it were their own.

MTS 200229 31

So, what are you waiting for?! Head on over and have a look-see for yourself – huge selection of tile from mild to wild you can find it at Morena Tile and Stone. Or call first and reserve some time with a designer (no charge for you, tell them “The Cat sent you.”)

Owners John and Linda SchrabOwners John and Linda Schrab

Cat Tip: If you need a fabricator for your countertops, or someone to install your tile, they have a fabrication shop on site with crews of experienced master craftsmen who have been with John’s family for decades. You will love how they combine their cutting-edge machine technology with old-world craftsmanship - which allows John the motto, “ we make things pretty everyday.”


Morena Tile Stone 08 2020

The Morena Tile team’s penchant for imagination and fun extends to its marketing - variations of this playful feline has become synonymous with the company’s moniker in South OC.


Morena Tile Stone 08 2020

32951 Calle Perfecto
San Juan Capistrano
(949) 489-8990
www.tileandmarble.com

At press time, there are over 35 counties in the state of California on Governor Newsom’s COVID-19 watch list. The phrase “watch list” doesn’t necessarily conjure visions of an idyllic vacation destination. Instead, it brings to mind images of a black and white FBI most wanted poster, plastered on community message boards and local law enforcement Twitter feeds. There is a raging debate about reopening schools in the fall, whether masks and social distancing will be enough to protect the kiddos walking out of their private quarantines and into a shared space with 30 other children. We’re headed for a fall full of masks and hand sanitizer, instead of pumpkin patches and spiced lattes in our carpool cupholders.

Catamaran Pool 2019

And yet the gorgeous summer weather is here. The beaches beckon. I know, because I’m feeling it personally. As happy as our home is, it’s always nice to have a change of scenery, perhaps even more so today than ever. A familiar refrain of family and friends these last few months is to keep in perspective the silver lining in this unprecedented time of staying close to home. However redundant it might sound, having more time as a family means we can spend more time as a family. And San Diego’s perfect climate, inviting beaches, abundant outdoor activities, and unbelievable accommodations make for an easily accessible, atmospheric time away - even if only for a few days.

Cataraman 0172

When researching options, we were hoping it wasn’t too tall an order to arrange an accommodation that was on the water, amenity-rich with family-friendly recreational opportunities (boat, jet ski or kayak rental - and a preferable heated - swimming pool were on our wish list). Hitting the mark on all counts, the Catamaran Resort Hotel and Spa stood out as our family’s first choice for a proverbial “end of summer/ease into fall” family-friendly staycation.

Dedicated to providing the most tropical and luxurious resort stay that safety and proper sanitation practices can deliver right now, the Polynesian-themed resort is a tropical hideaway that offers up an ambiance and experience that feels as though you’re on a Hawaiian island vacation sans the five-hour flight.

Cool ocean breezes, warm, friendly hospitality, sunny days, starlit nights, verdant greenery, tiki torches, waterfalls and ponds full of colorful koi, majestic palms swaying in the afternoon breeze and beautiful exotic birds that strike up conversation with passerby - these are among the things guests can expect here. That’s before mentioning the sparkling Pacific and long stretches of white sand beaches literally steps away. The Catamaran’s tropical vibe artfully blends the Aloha spirit where each of the property’s 310 luxurious suites, studios and hotel rooms feature a private balcony or patio with breathtaking views of Mission Bay, the Pacific Beach neighborhood and coastline, or the property’s lush tropical gardens.

Culinary delights

The resort’s signature restaurant, Oceana Coastal Kitchen features chef-driven, California cuisine and a modern, ocean-inspired design and ambiance defined by sweeping panoramic waterfront views (its adjacent Moray’s lounge is characterized by flickering flames from tiki torches and lava rock fire pits). Ranging from casual and family-friendly to upscale, the space includes several distinct ocean-inspired dining areas (the quartz-topped cold bar is embedded with mother of pearl and sea glass; the focal point of the main dining room is an impressive 800-gallon aquarium. In today’s cautionary environment, Oceana is serving Executive Chef Steven Riemer’s playful interpretation of classic dishes outdoors with patio dine-in service (seating is limited, so reservations are recommended).

Oceana Seafood Tower

Our family is represented on all culinary fronts. I am a seafood aficionado. My husband, Tim, is a meat-and-potatoes man. Our 12-year-old daughter has a pretty adventurous palate, but her 13-year-old brother always opts for traditional kid-friendly fare. There was something for everyone on Oceana Coastal Kitchen’s menu - abundant seafood selections, beef and chicken entrees and a variety of delicious flatbreads, including a sweet fennel sausage and classic pepperoni.

Oceana NightPatio lights

For my part, I went with seafood from start to finish - the hamachi crudo with white miso, micro cilantro and jalapeño from the cold bar was a wonderfully flavorful appetizer, followed by seared scallops paired with toasted couscous, preserved lemon and mint. Tim’s grilled-to-perfection Harris Ranch ribeye arrived with Yukon gold mashed potatoes and broccolini, preserved lemon and chili with bordelaise sauce.

Outdoor endeavors

We spent the entire day outdoors - starting with a spin around the bay aboard a 19’ Rinker rented through Action Sport Rentals (www.actionsportrentals.com), San Diego’s premier land and water sports rental company with multiple locations, including at the pier at the Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa. The powerboat we chose is a fast, fun craft that’s also a super comfortable ride for up to seven passengers - while boaters stay within the bay, our experience alternated between a leisurely cruise in the channels an an exhilarating ride at speeds topping 40 mph.

rinker website

Sunbathing and paddleboarding, relaxing by the pool, or simply cruising down the boardwalk definitely make my top-ten-distractions-from-home-schooling list. Choose a garden suite or tower escape at Catamaran Resort Hotel, grab a coffee or cocktail, and treat the entire family to some of the finest cuisine in America’s Finest City. We can all agree that times are challenging, and certainly, they may not clear up shortly as we’d all prefer. But who’s to say we can’t add a little joy to our definition of “new normal”?

Cataraman 0096


Catamaran Resort Hotel
3999 Mission Boulevard
San Diego
(858) 488-1081
www.CatamaranResort.com

Stratford School Unveils its Plan for Fall 2020

By Jeanne Huybrechts, Chief Academic Officer & Allison Wilson, Senior Director of Curriculum and Innovation Preschool-Grade 2, Stratford School

We are excited to welcome students back for the upcoming school year with safety in mind and plans for a flexible learning environment.

To date, we have established priorities aligned with our school’s mission and goals for students, created a return-to-school plan, and are building out support systems for several potential contingency plans. Here’s a preview of our plans:

Staying True to Stratford’s Guiding Principles

Safety

Our commitment to the health and safety of our school community is paramount. We will abide by all state and local statues, heed the advice of health organizations, notably the CDC, and maintain a clean and healthy environment within our schools. Additionally, we will implement several strategies to encourage behaviors known to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Quality Academic Programs

Depending on the final state and local statues for this school year wherein shelter-in-place or reduced-occupancy mandates are imposed, we will be ready to transition to one of several teaching and learning models, among them (1) a period of distance learning or (2) a hybrid of distance and on-campus learning (necessary, for example, if classroom capacity limits are imposed). Again, an uninterrupted traditional school year is our fervent hope however, every imaginable alternative scenario is being explored.

Commitment to Improvement

The school has committed to investing in computer hardware and software upgrades to aid in any hybrid accommodation we may face, and also at the request of our teachers, who, during the distance-learning period, learned and developed creative uses for instructional technology and learning programs, which they hope to continue using.

School year 2020-21 teacher training will focus almost entirely on blended learning techniques – how to develop curriculum and programing with clear through-lines that seamlessly integrate traditional and modern teaching pedagogies, synchronous and asynchronous learning, in-person and digital experiences.

A Caring Atmosphere

In all of our distance-learning interactions with students, we tried to bridge the digital gap with some playfulness, some fun, and other manifestations of care and connection. In advisory meetings and in academic classes, we incorporated elements that supported social-emotional health. During our months apart, social-emotional learning was more relevant than ever.

Onward with Optimism!

As communities begin to open back up, it is important to be mindful of potential messages around COVID-19 that may be confusing to children. Introducing proactive, age-appropriate discussions about how school might look different when they start the new school year are important topics in which to engage and develop as information evolves. This continued focus around what we do know about the virus and sharing the things that are within our control can help build confidence, and a level of comfort, in our children.

And, as we begin to plan for this upcoming school year, we are still driven by the mission and vision that attracted us to teaching in the first place, and we are reinvigorated by the creativity and inventiveness unleashed in response to extraordinarily challenging circumstances. We will begin the school year grateful for the opportunity to teach and to learn as we move onward to an excellent future!


To learn more about Stratford School or to schedule a personalized virtual tour go to stratfordschools.com!

The landscape of education evolved once again on July 17, when the governor issued a directive concerning when Orange County schools would be able to reopen with students on campus. While many schools struggle to keep up with the rapid changes brought about by COVID-19, leaders of Fairmont Schools feel their five campuses -- including the new preschool through grade 12 location in San Juan Capistrano -- are uniquely positioned to pivot and thrive in this challenging time.

Experience Plus Innovation

Voted Orange County’s ​Best Private School​ for five consecutive years, Fairmont has been a leader in private school education since its founding in 1953. Nearly 70 years’ experience equates to many lessons learned. So when the winds of education shift, as they are right now, no school is better-equipped to respond than Fairmont. As Orange County’s largest and oldest private school group, Fairmont is poised to provide its innovative individualized learning experience to students, ​regardless of the method of delivery​.

Ready for Remote

Building upon an already-strong remote program, the school invested heavily in technology and training to elevate the level of instruction it can provide to students who will be learning from home this fall. Small classes, differentiated learning, and rigorous curriculum are part of Fairmont’s “tried and true” formula for producing successful students of all ability levels. It’s a formula that has served students well for decades, and it’s one that has been integrated into the school’s remote learning program.

Another thing that sets Fairmont apart is the lengths its teachers and staff go to in caring for the overall well-being of students. “​This has always been important, but perhaps never more so than it is right now,” ​said Chad Jackson, Fairmont’s president. ​“Supporting our students’ social and emotional needs is key to our remote instruction.”

Prepared to Reopen

When Orange County schools are cleared to have students return, Fairmont will open the doors of its new San Juan Capistrano campus with a plan that ensures safety is paramount​ ​and students come first. At that time, Fairmont will be offering ​in-person instruction --​ ​five days a week and full days with experienced teachers​, further differentiating itself from almost every other school in south Orange County.

Fairmont’s teachers and administrators have been hard at work researching best practices for reopening, from sanitation and logistics to teacher training and technology. The school’s Reopening Task Force continues to consult extensively with medical and education experts, while monitoring local, state and federal guidelines to ensure its campuses can open safely. That plan includes everything from “the basics” (such as the use of social distancing, face coverings, and rigorous sanitation) to incorporating physical enhancements (such as the installation of touchless restroom fixtures).

“We are living through very challenging times, but Fairmont’s focus hasn’t shifted,” said David Jackson, Fairmont’s chairman. “Our students come first, and our teachers and staff have been working tirelessly to ensure everyone’s return to school exceeds expectations -- regardless of whether a child learns from home or in the classroom.”


Fairmont is now enrolling P-12th grade students for the 2020-21 school year across its family of schools in Anaheim, Anaheim Hills, North Tustin and San Juan Capistrano. To learn more visit fairmontschools.com or call 714-234-2771 to schedule a tour.

By Ryan Burris, Chief Communications Officer, Capistrano Unified School District

Capistrano Unified has spent the last three months building a reopening plan for the fall with the priority of providing an excellent education while ensuring the health and safety of our students and school employees.

On July 17, Governor Newsom announced that all schools within Orange County will be required to open the 2020-21 school year using online learning ONLY. Governor Newsom made this a requirement for all counties on the state’s coronavirus monitoring list. CUSD will reopen classrooms and campuses when the updated guidelines allow for school’s to safely do so.

The centerpiece of CUSD’s Trustee-approved reopening plan is a robust, consistent, and engaging curriculum that aligns with the District’s core values and can be successfully delivered both in a traditional school setting and online. In preparation for returning to school in August, our Board of Trustees approved a comprehensive online curriculum that has been vetted, used consistently with success, and delivers the District core values of rigor, engagement, consistency, and flexibility.

Our hybrid reopening plan includes:

K–5 Options when Orange County is removed from the monitoring list:

Students can spend 100 percent of their school time engaging in online learning or attending class on campus. Or they can split their time between home and school.

Secondary Options –– 6–12 when Orange County is removed from the monitoring list:

Students can choose 100 percent online learning or spend half their time on campus with a flipped classroom format utilizing independent study. CUSD will ensure juniors and seniors continue to have access to the resources they need to increase their options for post-secondary life after high school.

This plan provides an enriched learning curriculum compared to the distance learning initiative that was implemented quickly in response to the pandemic this past spring. CUSD continues its commitment to excellence in curriculum and instruction.

The 2020-21 CUSD school year will include an integration of mental health, emotional support, and social emotional learning. Administrator training was held in July and teacher trainings will be held in August. Monthly parent webinars will be held during the school year.

CUSD will also continue to foster cultural diversity in partnership with the district’s Cultural Proficiency Task Force, established last fall, and with our students, families, and staff. A workshop is planned in the fall to update the school board and the CUSD community on planned strategic actions and initiatives we are undertaking in this regard.

Although we are navigating unprecedented times, CUSD remains committed to academic rigor, consistency, and providing an engaging and flexible online and classroom educational experience for all students, while protecting the safety and security of families and employees.


social media block CUSD blue

For more information on CUSD’s reopening plans, visit capousd.org.

I wanted to share my latest family photo to remind us all of what is important, our family and health. I hope all of you are staying strong physically and mentally during this time.

The recent economic challenges and governmental changes remind me why I have a practice that is centered on taxation, investments and financial well-being.

Access to information is easily available…however, it takes a professional with experience to interpret, direct and provide perspective on these changes to provide clarity, calmness and a path to success.
Hopefully, you find my articles of benefit. Here are some current thoughts on a variety of topics.

  1. If you are a business owner or sole proprietor, you can apply for a Payroll Protection Program (PPP) loan. Although the first pot of money has already been committed, I anticipate the SBA Loan Administration will provide future borrowing opportunities. We can prepare your loan applications and guide you through the constantly updated changes in this loan program.
  2. Once you receive your PPP loan amount, pay careful attention to the eight weeks after receipt so you can take the necessary steps for your loan to be partially or fully tax-free and non-reimbursable. More guidance on how to do this will be forthcoming.
  3. If you are forced to access your IRA or pension account, new rules are in place so you can avoid the IRS 10% premature penalty if you are under age 59.5 as a Coronavirus Related Distribution. Pension plan loans have now been increased from a maximum of $50,000 up to the lesser of $100,000 or your plan balance. The 3 year loan payment schedule starts on the day after the distribution was received.
  4. For Sole Proprietors and Business Owners: Contact us to see if we can help you access these pension loans by transferring your IRA accounts into a newly created pension plan account. Remember, a loan might be more beneficial than a taxable IRA distribution especially since you are paying the interest into your own pension account.
  5. Visit the IRS website at www.irs.gov to click on “Get Coronavirus Tax Relief”. Get answers to the Economic Impact Payments ($1,200 for adults and $500 for children) including a link to “Check your payment status”.
  6. Use this idle time to pull your tax information and get it to your CPA who is still hard at work. There are many tax planning opportunities available with the recent tax changes and your CPA can only plan when he/she has your information.
  7. Consider funding tax-deductible IRA and pension contributions for tax year 2019 when you are in a higher tax bracket. You can always distribute these funds via a taxable distribution or a loan at a lower tax bracket, if applicable, in tax year 2020. IRA and H.S.A. contributions must be made by July 15th and pension contributions by the extended deadline for the return.
  8. Individuals with a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) from their IRA or pension account can skip the distribution for tax year 2020. Additionally, new rules allow individuals who have already taken out their 2020 RMD to roll the money back into the account within 60 days of the distribution to eliminate the taxable event and allow your money a chance to rebound from the recent market decline. If the distribution was made April 1st or later, you now have until July 15th to roll your money back.
  9. The IRS recently decreased the time frame you can stretch out income recognition out of your IRA account. This change, coupled with the strong prospects of increasing tax rates in the future, can alter your tax planning. Consideration should be given to purchasing life insurance to cover the increased tax burden being passed down to future generations.

CALL NOW OR GO ONLINE TO SCHEDULE YOUR TAX Preparation or Planning APPOINTMENT AT (949) 248-9815, Ext. 1.


prescott logo 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. • www.Prescott500.com
Securities and advisory services offered through Independent Financial Group, LLC (IFG), a registered broker-dealer and investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. PTWM and IFG are unaffiliated entities. Peter D. Prescott CA Insurance License #0733213.

For general informational purposes only. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualize tax advice. Please note that individual situations can vary.

Summer is upon us! Like many parents, you may be wondering if this time off from school should be spent on family vacations, planned activities at home, or summer camp. While family time spent together is extremely valuable, summer camp also offers many benefits that kids don’t necessarily get at school. The summer camp experience gives kids the opportunity to improve their “soft skills” and hard skills, meet and befriend new peers, and develop new interests. If you’re on the fence about sending your child to summer camp, here are a few things you need to know.

Kids break out of their school labels

Kids tend to get branded with labels in school: nerdy, athletic, popular, loud and funny, quiet and shy. By going to camp with different peers, your child has a chance to break out of their supposed categorization. They might feel less pressure to conform to their school label. And they’ll remember that who they are at school isn’t necessarily who they have to be all the time. It’s refreshing.

Kids can explore existing interests and develop new ones

One of the best things about summer camps is that there are so many of them that offer unique activities. There are over 14,000 day and resident camps in the United States, and they continuously adapt to the evolving interests of campers. Most camps offer traditional outdoors activities like recreational swimming and camping skills. New programs that have been introduced recently include adventure camps or programs, college planning, health and wellness, and more. If your child is interested in STEM hobbies like coding or robotics, going to a camp that specializes in these activities allows them to pursue their interests in a new setting. They’ll also encounter new ones at camp that they may not have considered before, like horseback riding or rock climbing.

Summer camp can help prevent summer learning loss

Summer learning loss, “summer brain drain,” or “the summer slide” is real: many students lose two to three months of reading and math skills during summer break. There are a few ways to prevent summer learning loss, and one of them is attending summer camp. Summer camp pulls double duty, not only keeping kids mentally stimulated, but physically active as well. There’s a myth that campers attending STEM camps or tech camps stay indoors and on a computer all day, but that’s an old stereotype. A good summer camp will provide kids with a well-balanced variety of activities, both mental and physical.

Camp teaches skills like independence and responsibility

Kids encounter the ultimate test of independence when going to camp: being away from their parents. They make small decisions for themselves: what to eat, what activities to do in their free time, who to talk to if they have a question or problem, and so on. These new experiences can be hard, but they’re ultimately worth it because of the boost in self-esteem and confidence.

In addition, camp can teach kids many other essential life skills: teamwork from working on projects, respect, and openness when meeting new peers, and resilience from navigating something new on their own.

MS Summer Science Kids4B4A3272 MedJY

Kids can make lifelong friends with other campers

In a study by the American Camp Association, an overwhelming number of campers said positive things about their camp experiences with other kids. A whopping 96% of campers said camp helped them make new friends, and 93% said camp helped them get to know kids who were different from themselves. Kids can bond over living together at resident camps or participating in the same hobbies at day camps. Kids who go to the same school may become friends out of proximity, but kids who become friends at camp have deeper connections rooted in similar interests.

Explore Stratford’s summer camps

Sending your child to summer camp clearly benefits them, and it benefits parents, too. Giving kids time away from their home, family, and belongings can help them appreciate what they have when they return. In addition, spending time away from each other can be revitalizing for both kids and parents. If you are looking for a STEM/STEAM summer camp that offers an enriching experience, take a look at Summer@Stratford. Stratford School’s summer camps tailor activities to each age group, providing campers with hands-on learning projects and real-world problems to tackle in a fun way.